TODAY'S HEADLINES

Drop raps vs de Lima - HRW; no political persecution in her case - Aguirre 19-Feb-17, 1:49 PM | InterAksyon.com | With reports from PNA, JV Arcena, News5

Another OFW sentenced to death in UAE - Villar 19-Feb-17, 1:16 PM | Ernie Reyes, InterAksyon.com

Opinion

JESSICA ZAFRA | Obituary for the formerly brilliant

InterAksyon.com
The online news portal of TV5

For a long time I have felt like a child whose beloved parent has dementia. I have watched as the sharp, shining intellect I had admired and respected was corrupted, dulled, and reduced to smearing excrement on the walls.

This person I looked up to as a mentor, who introduced me to great works of literature and humanist thought, who supported my own attempts at writing and taught me that language is a weapon, who helped me through my constant ineptitude about money, who even shared my love of cats, is gone. The surrogate parent who offered me advice and comfort when my own mother died, is no longer with us.

I have always known of the racism, the elitism and attraction to fascism. I explained this to myself as examples of his independent thinking and charming political incorrectness. He had always flown the flag for free speech, and believing in free speech means defending the right of other people to say things you disagree with, even if they make you sick. 

Over the years my explanations to myself have become more convoluted and illogical, but I wanted to believe that there was a point to all that, some end game too complex and brilliant for my mediocre brain. Loyalty and gratitude had blinded me from speaking. I thought that if I shut up, surely this vicious insanity would end, and once again we would be sitting down to a meal at which he would bring his own rice, steaming in its cooker, declare his love of HBO's Rome and Ciaran Hinds' portrayal of Julius Caesar, and bemoan, hilariously, the demise of his hair follicles. I would ask him for the thousandth time why he has never published his own book when far inferior writers publish regularly.

Those days are gone. We are never going to do that joint lecture on Russian novels. But I will get around to finishing The Death of Virgil by the Viennese Jew Hermann Broch, a book he gave me, in which the dying writer ruminates on the malevolence of the society he had lionized.

He has one last thing to teach me: that loyalty has its limits. Mine ends when literature and history are twisted to justify the unjustifiable.

OBITUARY FOR THE FORMERLY BRILLIANT

By Jessica Zafra

 

 

For a long time I have felt like a child whose beloved parent has dementia. I have watched as the sharp, shining intellect I had admired and respected was corrupted, dulled, and reduced to smearing excrement on the walls.

 

This person I looked up to as a mentor, who introduced me to great works of literature and humanist thought, who supported my own attempts at writing and taught me that language is a weapon, who helped me through my constant ineptitude about money, who even shared my love of cats, is gone. The surrogate parent who offered me advice and comfort when my own mother died, is no longer with us.

 

I have always known of the racism, the elitism and attraction to fascism. I explained this to myself as examples of his independent thinking and charming political incorrectness. He had always flown the flag for free speech, and believing in free speech means defending the right of other people to say things you disagree with, even if they make you sick.

 

Over the years my explanations to myself have become more convoluted and illogical, but I wanted to believe that there was a point to all that, some end game too complex and brilliant for my mediocre brain. Loyalty and gratitude had blinded me from speaking. I thought that if I shut up, surely this vicious insanity would end, and once again we would be sitting down to a meal at which he would bring his own rice, steaming in its cooker, declare his love of HBO’s Rome and Ciaran Hinds’s portrayal of Julius Caesar, and bemoan, hilariously, the demise of his hair follicles. I would ask him for the thousandth time why he has never published his own book when far inferior writers publish regularly.

 

Those days are gone. We are never going to do that joint lecture on Russian novels. But I will get around to finishing The Death of Virgil by the Viennese Jew Hermann Broch, a book he gave me, in which the dying writer ruminates the malevolence of the society he had lionized.

 

He has one last thing to teach me: that loyalty has its limits. Mine ends when literature and history are twisted to justify the unjustifiable.

 

advertisement
OTHER OPINION STORIES
BREAKING NEWS